Connecting...

Are you asking the right questions at job interviews?

You’re coming to the end of your job interview. You think it’s gone pretty well. There’s just one question left for you to answer: “Do you have any questions for me?”

 

It’s a simple yes or no answer, but say the wrong one and you risk undoing all that good work.

 

Yes, you need to nail the questions you’re asked during an interview, but you also need to ask questions in return that will make you stand out from other candidates.

 

Asking the right questions can highlight your qualities, skills, confidence, commitment, and show the interviewer why you’re such a great match for the role. It can also show that you understand the company’s challenges, and highlight how you can help the company reach its goals.

 

This is your chance to shine and show the interviewer you’re bringing something new to the table. If you have no questions to ask, the interviewer may assume you’re not interested or are unprepared.

 

Don’t think relevant questions will just come to you on the day. As you do your pre-interview research, make a note of the topics you want to ask about – the company, the role, the interviewer.

 

Here are a few questions you could be asking at your next interview!

 

1. Questions about the company

 

Can you tell me a bit about the company culture?

 

This will help determine if you’re a good fit for the organisation. You want to feel comfortable with the culture and dynamic of the company.

 

Where do you think the company is headed in the next five years?

 

A good question if you plan to stay in the role for a few years. If the company is growing, you’ll be able to grow with it.

 

2. Questions about the job

 

Can you tell me about the day-to-day responsibilities of the role?

 

This is the perfect opportunity to find out more about the role and assess if it’s the right one for you. You may have been given an overview, but a detailed description of responsibilities will give you more insight into the skills needed to carry them out.

 

What’s the most important thing I can achieve in the first month?

 

This will give you an indication of what’s expected from the role – and the person in it.

 

3. Questions about the interviewer

 

How long have you worked for the company?

 

The answer to this question is less important than the fact you’re showing the interviewer you’re interested in them as a person. It’s a great way to build rapport.

 

What do you like best about working here?

 

This will give you additional insight about their experience of working for the company – and may highlight some points you hadn’t considered.

 

Questions to avoid

 

Some questions could give the wrong impression and are best left alone, such as:

 

Anything to do with salary, annual leave and benefits: They suggest you’re focused on how the company can benefit you, not the other way round.

 

Yes or no questions: The idea is to create a dialogue between you and the employer, so ask open questions that will help the conversation flow.

 

Lots of questions on one topic: Asking questions only about the manager and his or her managerial style, for example, could suggest you have an issue with authority figures. Ask about multiple topics.

 

At Talent, we’re here to give you as much interview training and practice as you need. Our team of recruiters are happy to chat about interview skills and questions to ask before the big day. Get in touch to find out more.